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links within your website...

Normally, when you are linking to other pages within your website, you use the html code:

<a href="anotherpage.html">

To have the location bar change to include the name of the file, you must use the following code:

<a href="http://www.easytest.com/anotherpage.html" target="_top">

(please note the underscore " _ " character before the word " top " - it must be included)

The following links demonstrate what we mean. Just use the back button to return to look at the other link.

Always having the filename shown in the location bar with you domain name has one drawback. must send out a new frameset each time you want the location bar to change to include the filename. This can cause the pages on your site to load somewhat slower than if you just left the location alone.

using base tags...

If you wish to have the location change all the time and have several links on several pages that you do not want to go to the hassle of changing, you can use a <base href> and <base target> in the <HEAD> of your html files. All you have to do is place the following code at the top of each html document on your site and every link reference within your site will automatically change the location bar to include the filename:

<HEAD>
<TITLE>
My Website </TITLE>
<base href="http://www.mydomain.com/">
<base target="_top">
</HEAD>

* if you forget the trailing forward slash " / " at the end of your domain name in the base href you will get very unpredictable and very undesirable results.

The one small problem with this method is that when you use a base tag, all <img src> references must include the full path to the image including the domain name. This can sometimes be difficult to do through a WYSISYG editor, depending on which one you are using, particularly FP2000. So depending on what you are doing, or what method you use to develop your pages it may just be easier to use copy and paste to make the links in the form

<a href="http://www.easytest.com/anotherpage.html" target="_top">

links outside you website...

Normally, when you are linking to other pages or sites outside your website, you use the html code:

<a href="http://www.anothersite.com">

You can still do this with stealth redirection, but the address shown in the location bar will always be the original address entered (http://www.easytest.com for example). See what we mean. The easydns.com site will load, but the location will still show the easytest.com domain name. You should know that if you do this and the site you are linking to uses frames, your visitors will get some unpredictable results.

To break out of the stealth frameset and have the outside site load as it should, you must use the following code:

<a href="http://www.anothersite.com" target="_top">

(please note the underscore " _ " character before the word " top " - it must be included)

This link works properly.

The main easyDNS.com site will load with the correct domain name in the location bar.

one limitation...

One thing that URL forwarding unfortunately cannot support is the use of anchors to indicate a specific part of the page. This is usually done using:

<a name="here">

to define the specific part of the page to go to, and:

<a href="http://page.html#here">

to get to the page at that specific location. This will not work if your website is stealth forwarded.

The reason is that an anchor in a URL is not passed in the environment anywhere, so there is no way to grab it out of the environment, and no way to pass it on. The document anchor is just passed to the client browser which then maps into the document on the local copy rendered within the browser, giving us no opportunity to include it in the stealth forwarding.